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Cramp bark (Viburnum opulus)

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Also listed as: Viburnum opulus, Guelder rose
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • American guelder-rose, Caprifoliaceae (family), common guelder-rose, cranberry tree, European cranberry bush, guelder rose, pembina, proanthocyanidins, snowball tree, Viburnum opulus, Viburnum opulus L., Viburnum prunifolium L., viopudial.

Background
  • Cramp bark (Viburnum opulus) is native to Europe, northern Africa, and northern Asia. It has been used throughout the world as an ornamental plant. The bark has traditionally been used for cramps, including menstrual cramps and cramping associated with arthritis. Interestingly, a laboratory study found that viopudial isolated from Viburnum opulus had antispasmodic effects on smooth muscle. However, there is currently insufficient available evidence in humans to support the use of cramp bark for any indication.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Allergies, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antispasmodic, arthritis, asthma, astringent, cancer, colic, cramps, low blood pressure, menstrual pain, skin disinfectant/sterilization, stomach ulcers, vasodilator.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for cramp bark in adults.

Children (younger than 18 years)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for cramp bark in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to cramp bark or its constituents.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • There is no safety information currently available for cramp bark. Use cautiously in patients taking immunomodulators. Use cautiously in patients taking blood pressure altering agents.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Cramp bark is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Cramp bark may have disinfectant activity. Caution is advised in patients taking antibiotics.
  • Cramp bark may have antioxidant activity. Caution is advised in patients taking antioxidant drugs.
  • Cramp bark may prevent gastroduodenal mucosal damage. Caution is advised in patients with ulcers or taking antiulcer medications.
  • Cramp bark may have antispasmodic effects on smooth muscle. Caution is advised in patients taking antispasmodic agents.
  • Cramp bark extract may have astringent activity. Caution is advised in patients taking astringent agents.
  • Cramp bark may lower blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients with hypertension or hypotension and in those taking blood pressure altering drugs.
  • Cramp bark berries may enhance phagocytosis. Caution is advised in patients taking other immunosuppressant agents.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Cramp bark may have disinfectant activity. Caution should be used in patients using other antibacterial herbs or supplements.
  • Cramp bark may have antioxidant activity. Caution is advised if taking other herbs or supplements with antioxidant activity.
  • Cramp bark may have antispasmodic effects on smooth muscle. Caution is advised in patients taking other herbs or supplements with antispasmodic effects.
  • Cramp bark extract may have astringent activity. Caution is advised if taking other herbs or supplements with astringent effects.
  • Cramp bark may prevent gastroduodenal mucosal damage. Caution is advised in patients taking other herbs or supplements with antiulcer effects.
  • Cramp bark lower blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients with hypertension or hypotension and in those taking herbs or supplements with blood pressure altering effects.
  • Cramp bark berries may enhance phagocytosis. Caution is advised in patients taking other immunosuppressant herbs or supplements.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Nicholson JA, Darby TD, Jarboe CH. Viopudial, a hypotensive and smooth muscle antispasmodic from Viburnum opulus. Proc.Soc.Exp Biol.Med. 1972;140(2):457-461.
  2. Ovodova RG, Golovchenko VV, Popov SV, et al. [The isolation, preliminary study of structure and physiological activity of water-soluble polysaccharides from squeezed berries of Snowball tree Viburnum opulus]. Bioorg.Khim. 2000;26(1):61-67.
  3. Plouvier V. [PRESENCE OF URSOLIC ACID IN THE BLOSSOMS OF VIBURNUM OPULUS L. VAR. STERILE DC (CAPRIFOLIACEAE)]. Ann.Pharm Fr. 1964;22:313-314.
  4. Ryzhikov MA, Ryzhikova VO. [Application of chemiluminescent methods for analysis of the antioxidant activity of herbal extracts]. Vopr.Pitan. 2006;75(2):22-26.
  5. Smetankina PP. [DISINFECTANT PROPERTIES OF VIBURNUM OPULUS.]. Vestn.Dermatol Venerol. 1963;37:75.
  6. Smirnova AS, Iadrova VM. [Comparative study of the astringent effect of liquid extracts from Viburnum opulus L]. Farmatsiia. 1968;17(4):42-45.
  7. Zayachkivska OS, Gzhegotsky MR, Terletska OI, et al. Influence of Viburnum Opulus proanthocyanidins on stress-induced gastrointestinal mucosal damage. J Physiol Pharmacol 2006;57 Suppl 5:155-167.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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